Posts in the ‘Products’ Category

Leaking fountain sealed with polyurea

The Piazza d'Italia in downtown New Orleans centers around a fountain that includes the shape of Italy. A planned renovation included sealing the fountain, which had developed leaks over the years. The concrete restoration contractor hired for the job opted to use Prime Guard 7000 polyurea. The 6000-square-feet of fountain surface includes dozens of steps, meaning endless ...

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Field Notes: Inner Mongolia

David, our intrepid global traveler, went to Inner Mongolia, China, this week for on-site client training. The client is a privately-owned contractor specializing in repairs of the high-speed railway. The company needed options for minor lifting and stabilizing of the track slabs. The Precision ...

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Fixing a leaking spillway

A dam spillway should only be wet on occasion, but that was not the case in Lake Quivira, Kansas. The spillway of the dam on the manmade lake had standing water at the bottom at all times. Water from the lake seeped through the lakeside wall and up through the spillway floor. Replacing the spillway was not the preferred solution ...

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Field Notes: Historic Florida Bridge Rehab

New life for Old Spanish Harbor Bridge Old Spanish Harbor Bridge gets new life as a pedestrian bridge Our colleague Casey Pieczonka visited a cool job site a few weeks ago. The Old Spanish Harbor Bridge ...

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Meet The Patriot

The Patriot plural-component pump packs great performance into an amazingly compact platform. Whether you are applying polyurea joint fill, low/medium pressure polyurea spray, or polyurethane stabilization foams, the Patriot will tackle the most daunting tasks with the greatest of ease. See the Patriot in its debut at World of Concrete, running through noon Friday, Jan. 26. We are in booth 11315 in ...

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Highway stabilization with polyurethane

Highway stabilization with polyurethane resin offers a longterm solution to roadway settlement issues while allowing traffic to remain open during repairs. Single-component, low viscosity resins are effective for permeation grouting and void filling, including underneath asphalt. Where slab lift or stabilization is needed, such as bridge approaches, two-component lifting foams can effect compaction grouting and slab lift/stabilization. This can be ...

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Wood bulkhead repair with polyurethane foam

Wood bulkhead repair with Prime Flex 920 polyurethane foam Concrete, wood, sheet pile, stone. Seawalls and bulkheads can be made of many things. One thing they all have in common: eventually they need repair. If the issue is eroding soil due to failed joints or gaps below the structure, injecting a structural polyurethane foam may be the perfect no-dig solution. Prime ...

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Damaged Seawall or Bulkhead?

If storms left you with a damaged seawall or bulkhead, we have a solution. This year's storm season has taken a major toll on seawalls and bulkheads across the U.S. and Caribbean. Storm surge and flooding can cause erosion not previously experienced under and behind these otherwise sound structures. In some cases, replacement may be the only option if there is ...

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Stopping leaks to prevent erosion

Leaking stormwater or sewer pipes are often the root cause of sinkholes and less extreme depressions in surfaces. When the surface is an airport runway, stopping erosion that could lead to dips in the concrete is particularly critical. Miles of storm sewer pipes under a Midwest airport with very high groundwater were leaking, causing exfiltration, erosion and voids. A mudjacker was ...

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Filling voids behind sheet pile

Sheet pile is commonly used for seawalls, bulkheads and sometimes even retaining walls. In this case, the main bridge to the cruise passenger terminal at the port in Jacksonville, Fla., has a sheet pile retaining wall at its base. The ocean has taken a toll over time: The sheet pile is corroded. Gaps in the wall caused significant erosion, which, left ...

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